April 11 2017

Stained Glass Crochet Blanket – Current Project

This stained glass crochet blanket is another project that has been on my to-do list for a while now. My ten year old has a baby blanket that is a similar design and I have been planning a larger one, with an added touch of magic 🙂 I am not sure what the finished size will be but due to the way it is made, it is very easy to make in any size you wish.

I have decided to add a little number magic into the blanket and use multiples of seven and three were possible within the design. However I have decided to keep to the standard six stitches on the corners for ease of following the pattern and keeping things balanced and even. Each of the squares in my stained glass crochet blanket is made up of seven rows of colour and one row of black border. I am considering adding another two rows of black border as that would mean each square consisted of seven rows of colour and three rows of black. I’m not sure if that will be too much black but will test it out once I have made a few more squares. I will then sew these squares together and then add a row of two of black border around the whole blanket. I will most likely add two rows in keeping with the numbers as there will be three outer rows of black. I haven’t yet decided between two rows of stitches to match the blanket or one row of these and then a row of scallops or another border stitch. On my last blanket I added a row of normal crochet and then a row of scallops in the same colour and was really pleased with how it came out.

 

Stained glass crochet

 

I have not decided on a final size for my stained glass crochet blanket. It will be made up of the smaller squares in either a multiple of seven or three. I am temped to make another large blanket but at the same time to go for something smaller. A nice size for using on the sofa would be good. I suspect that Rowan may claim it once it is finished as he loves blankets.

 

Stained Glass Crochet Blanket Instructions

These granny squares are the first thing I learnt to crochet, many years ago. They are great as they are so versatile and can be made in so many sizes and colour combinations. My eldest son has a blanket made up of lots of small squares whereas the blanket I made my daughter is one huge square that I went round and round. Getting towards the end of that blanket was great as I was able to use it to keep warm too. I was first shown how to make these by a friend when I was at school and made several cushions and blankets. Then I did n;t crochet for several years and had to try and remember the best I could how to create them. I found that they would often come out a little lop-sided or wonky and so I have tweaked what I remember to get a neat square that stays flat and neatly square.

Please note that all terms used throughout the pattern are UK versions. I am using double knitting yarn from various brands. Most is what I have in my stash but I am always on the look out for nice yarns to add 🙂 I used approximately 20g of yarn for each coloured section, to give you an idea of how much is needed.

If you are unsure how to do a treble crochet stitch there are some nice instructions here
Start at step 1.

1. Magic loop

2. 12 triple crochet into loop

3. Join with a slip stitch

4. Chain two, five treble crochet in same hole

5. Skip 3 stitches, 6 treble crochet into next stitch. Repeat twice more so you have four lots of six treble crochet. Join with a slip stitch.

 
Teble crochet square

 

6. Slip stitch along two stitches (like on C2C decrease) so you are in the middle of a group of six treble stitches.

7. Ch 2, five treble crochet in space

8. Skip three stitches, three treble crochet in space.

9. Skip three stitches, six treble crochet in space. (The blocks of six treble crochet form the corners).

10. Repeat steps 8 and 9 twice more.

11. Skip three stitches, three treble crochet in space

12. Join with a slip stitch.

 

Granny square

 

13. Six treble crochet into corner

14. Continue adding blocks of treble crochet in this way until you reach the end of the row (six treble crochet in corners and three in all other spaces) until end of the row.

 

Stained glass crochet instructions

 

15. Repeat steps 13 and 14 three times more.

 

Finished crochet square

 

16. Change to black

17. Crochet one full row

Join with a slip stitch and fasten off. Sew in yarn ends.

 

Stained glass crochet blanket

 

Save

Save

Save

Share Button
April 7 2017

Craft Project – How to Make Shell Candles

I saw a picture of this shell candle project online a while ago, pinned it and like with so many then forgot to go back to it. Saw it again yesterday while looking through my account for a home ed art/craft idea and decided to give it a try. I have a large box of shells that I have collected over the years. I collected these when we lived near the sea and thought they would be perfect. Any shell that has a bowl like shape should work out fine. The whole project took me less than an hour to complete so it really is a nice, easy and not too time consuming craft to try out. I did it myself but it could also be done with a child, just as long as care is taken with the hot wax.

I decided to use some vanilla scented tea light candles that I had but these could be made using bought wax pellets and wicks. The shell candles could also be made using leftover bits of other candles. If you are using wax pellets or candle scraps you will need to buy fairly short wicks to go with them. I reused the wicks from my tea lights and they have worked out fine. That was another advance to using the readymade tea lights, as I do have some wax pellets but no wicks. This post has instructions based on using tea lights but the steps are very similar whatever source of wax you have.

 

finished shell candles

 

Making Shell Candles using Tea lights

  • I used six tea lights to make my candles but the amount of wax needed will depend on how large and deep your shells are.
  • Remove all of the packaging, including the metal tray.
  • Break the candles into a microwave safe bowl or other container. The container should be easy to pour from or it may be difficult to transfer the wax to your shells. As you remove the wicks check for any glue as some are stuck down. Remove this and discard.

 

wax for shell candles

 

  • Place the wicks into your shells. Try to position them as centrally as possible. This helps to ensure that the finished candle will burn evenly.

 

shell candles

     

  • Heat the wax in a microwave, in 30 second increments. Timings may vary depending on your microwave and wax. My 800 watt microwave took two minutes. Once the wax is almost melted you can simply stir it for a short time to finish melting the last small pieces.You could also melt your wax in a pan on your hob over a gently heat. I chose the microwave as it’s quick; I could use a disposable container and didn’t have to worry about any possible damage to my cooking pans or about cooking food in them afterwards. I really should buy a cheap crafts only saucepan for these kinds of projects. It’s something I’ve been meaning to do for years but always forget!

    Depending on the shape of your shells you may find that you need to support them to stop the wax spilling. This is just until the wax has hardened. I used the metal containers from the tea lights to do this.

  •  

shell candles waiting to harden

 

If a shell is very unstable it may be best not to use it, as it may be hard to burn it safely. When being burnt the shell candles will need to be placed on a heatproof surface. This could be a glass, stone or metal candle plate or if appropriately shaped a tea light or other candle holder.

 

Do not worry too much about spills of wax or if any is on the outside of the shells. This can be mopped up with kitchen towels now or is easy to remove once hardened.
Leave the candles in a safe place until the wax is completely hard. The time list takes is dependent on various factors such as the heat in the room. Once it has begun to harden you should find that you can move the candles and they will not need supporting to prevent the wax spilling out. The wax I spilt came off the table easily using a plastic modelling tool (for clay). I wasn’t happy with how one of my shell candles looked so once the wax was hardish but not completely hard I used the modelling tool to gently scrape away the excess. I also added a small amount of melted wax to the dip in that candle. I used a small piece from the spillage and gently added it the shell candle.

My candles were dry enough to feel hard and not spill within 20 minutes but I left them overnight to be sure they were dried all the way through. Other than the top centre one, they all stand up pretty well by themselves now. This is due to the wax helping to balance them out. However it’s best to place the shell candles on a safe surface before lighting, just as you would any candle. It will also make any spills of wax easier to clean. I will use a glass candle plate when burning mine. However, I really like the candles and feel like they are too sweet to light! I can’t see any reason why the shells won’t be okay to use again with fresh wax and wicks once these are burned down. I am wondering if the shell will be weakened by the heat but guess I will have to wait and see and experiment carefully.
 

 

Save

Save




 

Share Button
Category: Crafts | LEAVE A COMMENT
March 7 2017

Random Stripes Crochet Blanket Update – Project Finished

Last week I managed to get my random stripes crochet blanket finished and edged. I started this one in January and then at the beginning of February I discovered C2C crochet and really wanted to give it a try. I wanted to get the stripes blanket finished first but in end gave in and made a start on a large C2C blanket. I am using two strands of DK yarn and a 8mm hook again and the finished blanket will be 160 x 230cm. My biggest crochet piece ever! and I am planing on it being a stash busting project. Will update on that as I go.

The random stripes crochet blanket is a gift for a friends baby. The largest stripe is seven rows wide and smallest is one row, with all sizes inbetween. It was made almost entirely from my yarn stash, I saw a dark plum coloured yarn and really liked it so bought two 50g balls. I wish I had bought more now as it looks really nice used – which makes me not want to use the rest as then it will be gone! ha ha, does any one else save their best or favourite yrans (beads, papers, cords, ingredients…) and then never end up actually using them at all? Can’t just be me 😀 Once I was finished I wasn’t too sure I was happy with the blanket and I am dissapointed in how one of the yarns looks. It’s a furry varigated style and I feel like it look out of place. However I feel like the bits that I am not happy with are all things no one else will even notice. It’s an artists curse – always seeing fault in what others see only as perfect.

crochet blanket

Finishing the stripes crochet blanket kinda snuck up on me. I hadn’t looked at the blanket at all for about a week as I had been working on my C2C blanket but when I took it out of my bag I realised it was getting pretty big for a baby blanket. I like to make my baby blankets so they can be folded in use for extra cold days, which also means that they last a few years before being too small. My youngest is nearly 18 months and his crochet blanket still has loads of growing room in it. With so much work and time going into them it is nice that they aren’t get a short term use thing.

I had decided at the start that the blanket would be edged in black for a bold, contrasting effect. It’s not a traditionally coloured baby blanket at all but that completly suits the recipients tastes. The baby is a little girl but I went for a mix of all colours for variety. I added one row of treble crochet stitches in black but felt that it didn’t quite finish off the blanket properly. It was too abrupt. I had a browse on Pinterest for crochet edgings but choose to go with scallops, which gave the look I was after. Each scallop is made up of three treble crochet stitches and seven on the corners.


stripes crochet blanket

Using two strands of yarn to make my stripes crochet blanket has made it quite a chunky blanket with a bit of bouncy stretch. It is the second blanket I have made that way and I really like the squishy, cuddly softness of the style.


scallop crochet edge

Random stripes crochet blanket

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Share Button
December 15 2016

Jewellery Making Business: Start Your Own! – Introduction Video

My jewellery making course has is now rated five stars on www.ofcourse.co.uk. I designed and created the course with complete novices and those just starting out in mind. The course covers a range of topics including using colour in jewellery making, different types of beads, information on tools and precious and semi-precious gemstones. The final section covers how to start selling jewellery on and offline and some practical and legal matters than need to be considered or followed.

Jewellery making business course that will teach you the key skills for designing fabulous jewellery, and setting up a business to sell jewellery. Do you have a passion for creating jewellery that you want to make into your career? Have you always wanted to know how to design your own jewellery products? This course will teach you the key skills for creating and designing fabulous jewellery, and will then explain what is required to price and sell jewellery online and offline.

Visit the Jewellery Making Business: Start Your Own! course page for full details and to sign up and get started.  Use code; TEACHER_CLAIRE50 at checkout to receive a 50% discount on the course price.

Course Highlights

  • Over 2 hrs of video content to help you create jewellery, with supporting PDF Tutorials for making specific jewellery
  • Learn how to create a profitable jewellery making business
  • Detailed presentations explaining how to utilise beads of all materials
  • Pricing strategies, and legal information concerning the running of a jewellery making business

Enrol to Earn Your Certificate

  • Enrol and become certified in a new skill
  • Share your new skill with employers, friends and colleagues
  • Build a porfolio of course projects
Share Button
September 8 2016

Online Jewellery Making Course Update

My online jewellery making course is now live and ready to go! The course is available via the online learning provider Of Course and covers a wide range of related subjects including bead types, where to find inspiration, colour schemes and to get started with your own jewellery making business. The course also includes several step by step tutorials showing you how to create finished pieces of jewellery.

Description from the course page:

Do you have a passion for creating jewellery that you want to make into your career? Have you always wanted to know how to design your own jewellery products? This jewellery making business course will teach you the key skills for creating and designing fabulous jewellery, and will then explain what is required to price and sell jewellery online and offline.

Claire Pearcy, your course instructor, is the founder, designer and owner of Elderberry Arts.  She specialises in creating handmade unique and uncommon jewellery made using a variety of materials including wood, silver, hemp, glass, crystal, gemstones and lamp work.

She is an experienced Jewellery tutor, and will guide you through all of the steps required to set up a thriving jewellery making business. She has included detailed tutorials concerning bead type, bead shape, bead sizes, using semi-precious stones, advice on design and creative inspiration, and detailed practical advice on setting up a jewellery making business.

If you want to make your creative skills into a career sign up to this course today!

 

Highlights

  • Over 2 hrs of video content to help you create jewellery, with supporting PDF Tutorials for making specific jewellery
  • Learn how to create a profitable jewellery making business
  • Detailed presentations explaining how to utilise beads of all materials
  • Pricing strategies, and legal information concerning the running of a jewellery making business

 

Who is this course for?

  • Jewellery makers of all ability who want to learn how to turn their passion into a business
  • Beginners wishing to learn how to create jewellery
  • All ability jewellery makers who want to expand their jewellery making skills

Earn Your Certificate of Completion!

 

No previous knowledge of jewellery making is needed and you can work through the course at your own pace. Each video and document is available to view whenever and as many times as you need (files can also be downloaded to keep). This complete online jewellery making course can be found here.

Share Button
April 18 2016

Jewellery Making Tutorials Update *April 2016*

Jewellery making tutorials

 

I have been selling my jewellery making tutorials through the Jewelry Lessons website since 2010 and have met many lovely people there. Sadly the site will be closing in June 2016 and no further sales will be possible. After careful consideration I have decided to reopen my Etsy shop and will be adding all of my downloadable tutorials for sale there. So far I have added fourteen jewellery making tutorials. Most are macramé tutorials but there are also some others. The process is taking a bit of time as I have to edit the original files to remove some aspects related to Jewelry Lessons and in some cases change the layout to make best use of the remaining space. I am hoping to have them all moved over by June.

Each of my jewellery making tutorials features step by step instructions and high quality colour photographs that show you how to create a unique piece of jewellery. A few of the tutorials require you to have some prior knowledge but most are suitable for beginners as they explain everything you need to know. Over time I plan to edit my older macramé tutorials to include knotting instructions in the same way the newer ones have. My macramé jewellery making tutorials also include information on how to create a simple macramé board and explanations of some commonly used terms.

 

The new Elderberry Arts shop on Etsy is called ElderberryTutorials and all the tutorials will be available there. Facebook pages also have a great feature that allowed me to link the Etsy shop with the Elderberry Arts fan page. This means that if you head over to the page and click on the ‘My Etsy Shop’ tab ait will display all the listed jewellery making tutorials. Clicking on any item then sends you to the Etsy site to read the full details and purchase if you wish. I will also add the Etsy shop widget on the site here, which works in much the same way.

Share Button
December 2 2014

Snowflake Earring Tutorial Now Avaliable

This tutorial provides step by step instructions with colour photographs showing how to create a pair of unusual earrings.

You will not need any prior knowledge other than how to open and close a loop using pliers in order to complete this tutorial. The cord and bead colours can be customized to suit your own preferences if desired.

Snowflake Earring Tutorial

Perfect for the winter season this full colour, step by step tutorial is now available to download from Jewelry Lessons. Every aspect of creating this unusual piece of jewellery is explained within the earring tutorial so it is suitable for beginner and more experienced jewellery makers alike.

 

Share Button